Spring Is Here (Theoretically)

The little red coop is illuminated in the setting sun

The little red coop is illuminated in the setting sun

Spring is here, according to the calendar. The snow falling from the sky seems a little contradictory. Frankly, I’ve just given up. I have accepted the fact that warm weather is never going to happen again, and that I should just get used to the winter jackets and sweatpants.

The lazy chickens have retired early...I peeked my head in and found this...

This New England weather has gotten me so confused. It rises into the 40s, and all of a sudden I’m walking around outside with just a t-shirt shirt and jeans on. But then it starts snowing the next day, and it is back to the multiple layers of coats, sweaters, and socks. I just know that the tulips, crocuses, and daffodils are trying to arise from the dirt. If only there wasn’t a foot of snow barring their path to the sun.

The other day I strolled outside to my chicken coop, and did a double take as Edith stepped out into the run. His comb had fallen off, leaving a strange looking (for lack of a better word) nub… I started laughing immediately, but halted when he glared at me, as if to suggest that it was my fault. I retreated back into the warmth after doing the daily chicken chores, feeling slightly bad that his once majestic comb has been diminished so completely.

The other issue I have been facing is eggs. I have too many!  I’ve resorted to handing them out by the half-dozen to neighbors, out of complete desperation for more fridge space. I really want to sell them, but I’m not sure if I need a license for that, and since my chicken operation is supposed to be “covert” (I’m pretending that my neighbors can’t actually hear Edith serenading them in the mornings) I don’t want to draw extra attention to it. I’ll have to do some more research. Farm stands are a really popular thing in my town- people just set up a table on the side of the road with a box for money and piles of fruit vegetables. Asparagus and strawberries decorate these stands in the spring time, and then lots of corn and tomatoes in the summer. Pretty much every turn you take leads you to another one. Why not have one of my own?

The Chickens Getting Ready for Bed

Photo Mar 18, 6 40 58 PMThey were slightly offended by my intrusion A curious angle of chickens roosting...

Gender roles, cannibalism and a new egg

This morning I woke up with my eyes watering and feeling completely congested. Outside it was -10 degrees Fahrenheit, and I decided that today was not a good day for dealing with high school. So here I lie on the couch, my nose causing many tissues to be used, hoping that this nasty sickness will go away as  soon as possible. In my boredom I picked up a Gardener’s Supply Company catalog and flipped through the glossy pages of seedlings and perfect tomato plants. A utopia of successful gardens.

I looked outside at the large amount of snow and groaned at the groundhog’s poor choice to extend winter.

 

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As I looked through the catalog, I couldn’t help but recall the lesson we learned in Sociology class a few weeks ago about gender roles in the media. Every single picture in the catalog involving actual gardening depicted a middle aged woman smiling joyfully during the summer afternoon (at times hand in hand with a child). All of the pictures of men either involved building the garden beds, or washing cars… interesting.

As you well know if you’ve been keeping up with the blog, I’ve been having a rough time with the chickens. Today is no exception. For the past week I’ve noticed the hens pecking at Edith’s comb. Blood is splattered all over the coop walls from him shaking his head, and one night I saw it was dripping down his neck feathers. Yes, thats right, my chickens are now cannibals.

So, how to stop this behavior? Well I discovered that the bag balm I’ve been smothering on Edith every night to prevent frostbite has been hindering the affect of the Blu-Kote (the blue stain/antifungal formula that is used to prevent pecking). The Blu-Kote was just coming off, and the hens then saw the blood underneath and continued pecking. Because I had a night above freezing, I didn’t apply bag balm. Instead, I carefully dabbed the comb with Blu-Kote, and let it sit over night. Since then it has stayed on- problem solved. For now.

I feel bad for them, because all they have to do during the day is walk around a small dirt run. To enhance their time I’ve been scattering their food on the ground so they have to hunt for it. I’ve also dropped a few leaves of kale every once in a while, as well as cracked corn (chicken scratch) to keep them warm. Of course, I have to go easy on the treats, because fat chickens have multiple health issues.

Another recent issue is the reappearance of excrement on Cora’s vent feathers. I have to get to the bottom of this issue (no pun intended), and figure out why the feces keep building up in her feathers. Its quite a hassle to remove the mess, as it involves warm water, gross hands, and a chicken in the basement.

Finally, I have one more announcement. Two days ago, I strolled into the coop and opened the nest box looking for Cora’s usual brown egg… and found…

THIS

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MABEL LAID AN EGG! And its white!!

I’ll Speak In Pictures

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Hello everyone!

I’m sorry for my recent absence. Very few things have happened around here. I did take a few pictures yesterday, so I’ll share those with you.

Mabel is coming out of her shell a bit. While she won’t allow me to pet her feathers, she will gladly accept scratch at my feet, or a handful of grass through the fence. She is getting bigger, and her muffs and beard are more pronounced!

I really hope she’ll let me grow closer with her, she seems like a really sweet bird.

There has been a steady stream of beautiful brown eggs- they get more and more perfect with every day. I used one of them when I baked scones the other day. What a difference it made in the color of the batter! They also make DELICIOUS egg sandwiches. My father made an omelet, and cooked some prosciutto, and I ate it in a toasted asiago bagel. Absolutely delicious.

Oh, and before I forget, my father has finally finished the coop! He is building the run as we speak. Now I just have to figure out how to get my giant, grumpy rooster and his skittish hens from the A-Frame to their new home. A daunting challenge, for sure.

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Another!

Another egg! This one is perfect in every single way. Smooth shell, no blemishes. I’m so happy! As I write this, my father is in the kitchen, cooking bacon and frying the egg from today.

I can’t wait to eat it.

I’ve consulted BYC, asking who they thought laid these eggs, and they said my Rhode Island Red, Cora, probably did. I wonder what Mary’s will look like! Or better yet, Mabel, who is supposed to lay blue-green eggs. They also said it was fertilized. Looks like Mr. Edith is doing his job 😉

Now before you gasp, and ask how in the world anyone could eat an egg that with a baby chick inside it, you’re wrong. Write now this “possible baby chick” is a speck smaller than a freckle. There is nothing alive about it. In order for a baby chick to be created, the fertilized egg must be incubated for about 21 days. Therefore, I’m not a terrible person. 🙂

Egg Photo shoot
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